Primary school program

Click Against Hate is an interactive program taught using a PowerPoint demonstration, discussion and a final collaborative presentation by students.

The program was adapted in 2014 to suit students in Grade 5/6.    We found that this is the age that students are discovering social media, and are unsure how to navigate it safely.  Our presenter engages with the students and equips them will appropriate tools on how to be safe on line.

We cover a wide range of topics including:

Invasion of Privacy, cyber bullying, online dangers, Stereotyping, Incitement, Defamation, YouTube reporting, Facebook reporting, anti-Semitism, Islamophobia, racism, freedom of speech and vilification, pluralism/diversity/multiculturalism, attitudes to Indigenous Australians, bystander vs upstander, scams/identity theft/trolling/phishing/privacy

The aim of CAH is to challenge the students and take them ‘out of their comfort zone’ by using real life examples and giving them the opportunity to become involved in the discussion.

When addressing primary students we tailor the program to suit the younger students and we are happy to leave out any topics if requested by the school.

The program is generally run over two days.  We require one and a half  hours for the first session followed, the next day, by a slightly shorter consolidation session.

As a final activity, in the follow up session, students are asked to create a poster to send the message of diversity and online safety to others in their school community. They choose a theme for their poster from the many key terms covered in the program.  The posters are then displayed in the school and these students become ambassadors for the values of tolerance and respect.

Classes are kept small for maximum benefit. When the students are put into smaller groups, we find that this is when they feel most comfortable to ask questions and participate.  This is when the real learning takes place.

Key terms/topics:

pluralism/diversity/multiculturalismdiscriminationbystander vs upstander
bigotry/intolerance/hatestereotypingcybersafety
racismdefamationcyberbullying
islamophobiaincitementscams/identity theft/trolling/phishing/privacy
antisemitismprejudicereporting
gender stereotypesattitudes to Indigenous Australians

When the students are put into smaller groups, we find that this is when they feel most comfortable to ask questions and participate.  This is when the real learning takes place.